Tortelli: queen of pasta in Tuscany’s Mugello region

I think of the various regions of Tuscany as having personalities and characteristics as do people, and, like people, some are more simpatico than others. The Maremma, for instance, is an ambling and amiable urbane cowboy with a touch of SoCal hedonism: John Travolta. The Chianti is an over-popular glam girl who’s gotten rather full of herself–she’s the homecoming queen, the Kim Kardashian of Tuscany. By contrast, the Mugello–that mountainous, undulating region north of Florence, whose rugged Appenine spine straddles Emilia-Romagna–is the pensive, strong and silent type: pure Wayne, Eastwood or Bogart.

It’s a beautiful region of thick forest, serene pastures, rolling farmland and lonely mountain passes. Its towns are peaceful, slumberous, wrapped in the solitary life as befits hill folk and those who live close to the land. It’s a place of hunters and foragers, of Nature’s willing bedfellows; a place that prizes hard work, reserve and fortitude and the kind of quiet perseverance of earthworms. Mugellani are typically hardy souls, with rustic appetites that heavily favor meat in the form of beef and all manner of pig. Wild boar, porcini and pecorino feature predominantly on their menus. And the pasta most familiar to all who call this wedge of Tuscany home is tortelli, which are essentially large ravioli with a flavorful potato filling. A very homey dish, whose absence at any family gathering or holiday meal would be unconscionable: it’s the Martin Luther to their Protestant Reformation, Mick Jagger to their Rolling Stones, Sam Gamgee to their Frodo Baggins. And since both sides of Paolo’s family hail from this region, I can say with complete lack of irony that I’ve probably eaten about 6,346 of these potato-stuffed pillows of bliss, and I shall never tire of them.

Paolo’s aunts in Luco di Mugello and Borgo San Lorenzo are justifiably famous for their tortelli–which are, in a word, awesome. Cooking for 40 or 50 family members poses no problem to these fabulous, formidable ladies, who hold forth in a kitchen the way Elizabeth I held court at Whitehall. Paolo’s own mamma also inherited the family’s flair for this regional pasta specialty, and it is from this group of women that the secrets to good tortelli were handed down, to be served up in our little yellow cart right here in Portland, Oregon.

As with many regional dishes, each family has its cherished recipe, but tortelli mainly fall into two camps: those with a potato filling that’s flavored with soffritto and tomato, or one that is flavored with prosciutto, sausage or pancetta. The topping is nearly always a ragù, though they are delicious with a simple sauce of butter and sage, too.

Eastertortelli

Just a *few* handmade tortelli for family Easter in Florence

IMG_0902

Burrasca’s tortelli with duck ragù

At Burrasca, our handmade tortelli are filled with potato amped up by soffritto, a touch of tomato and herbs, and we serve them in a rich duck ragù {we happily accommodate vegetarians by substituting a sauce of butter and sage–just ask!}.

Come try some and make Paolo’s aunties proud!

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2 thoughts on “Tortelli: queen of pasta in Tuscany’s Mugello region

  1. Are you KIDDING me?! No, you are KILLING me. I can’t believe we can’t come eat these TOMORROW because we have other plans. Please tell me they will be on the menu for awhile and we’ll make a post-Natale foray out for a scorpacciata!
    PS Beautifully written, Betta.

    • I know, I know: shoulda slapped a warning on this post: May Cause Uncontrollable Cravings ;-)

      Fear not; they will be on the menu for a while, Kirsten. And thanks for the kind compliment.

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