Putting the “FUN” into crowd-funding: we’ve launched our Kickstarter campaign!

We’re close to finding a permanent home for Burrasca, and in the meanwhile feel it’s time to launch our modest bid for needed start-up funds. If you can, please pledge whatever you’re comfortable with–and there are some fabulous and zany rewards and incentives–or simply SHARE THE LINK to the campaign on your social media channels, among your friends and networks, heck, even tell your kids (assuming they have allowance money to donate ;-) ).

C’mon, we can DO this! Forza Burrasca!!!!

Know that we’re already so grateful for the support you’ve shown us, and we thank you in advance for helping our cause in the way that feels best to you.

Watch the video and click here for the link to the campaign page!

Fall in love at a food cart this year

We may be known for dishing up authentic Florentine food, but did you know we also dish up romance?

Jordan and Kelsey had their first date at our food cart over a year ago, and these two adorable sweeties have been together ever since. Jordan worked with us during this past summer, and Kelsey danced her way through our recently-filmed music video. We are ready whenever they are to cater their wedding and baby showers! :-)

Ahhh, amore: there’s not a more fitting way to kick off the new year than by celebrating love. May your 2015 be brimming with it!

Best wishes from the Burrasca family: Paolo, Elizabeth, Giacomo & Gemma

Winter hours and other news

Cari amici, it’s time to hunker down for the season and for us that means introducing WINTER HOURS. So please note that we will now be closed on Mondays and Tuesdays. Wednesday-Saturday 11:30 to 7pm, Sunday 11:30-3pm.

We also need the extra time to hunt down the perfect space for our brick & mortar incarnation!

As hardy Portlanders, we all need to get over it and embrace the rain–it’s just part of the package that comes with living in the gorgeous, lush, geographically blessed and verdant Pacific Northwest. This means supporting our favorite food carts through the slower, mucky season so that they’re there for us in July when temps are 80 degrees and we feel like frolicking in the sun :-) In our pod, the double-decker bus provides shelter from the elements, and Vino Wine Shop, right next door on 28th, encourages cart food to be brought in and consumed in cozy warmth. And what better way to enjoy the offerings of Guero, Steak Frites, Wolf and Bear’s, Grilled Cheese Grill or Burrasca than with a glass of wine? They’ll even provide the stemware should you pop for a bottle.

Portland Monthly graciously included us on their list of How to Devour Portland’s Restaurant Scene in 7 Days. Check it out–we’re in pretty fine company!

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Our recent event at the cart–the Sagra dell’Olio Nuovo–was a roaring success. We had great fun and it was wonderful to have Lee Collins from Oregon Olive Mill (the source of our peppery, freshly-milled EVOO) on hand to talk about olive oil and offer tastings. Steven Shomler, author of Portland Food Cart Stories (which features our Florence-to-Portland saga) was also there, talking carts and sharing his infectious enthusiasm.

As always, thank you all for your support and hearty appetites! We continue to feel blessed and pinch-me-I-must-be-dreaming happy about our decision to make this fabulous city our home.

Some recent press

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Local food writer and blogger, Kathleen Bauer of  Good Stuff NW, wrote a piece on us for The Oregonian. She does a wonderful job telling our story and the motivations that drive (so to speak) our little food cart.

You can read it here. (Plus there’s the recipe for our summertime fave: pappa al pomodoro!)

Serious Eats, the online blog about all things seriously food, wrote about our food cart pod—which boasts a wonderful, superbly-curated variety of carts and food offerings (we know because we’ve eaten at all of them!). Nice input and insights from all the cart owners.

Read it here.

Our deepest gratitude to these writers for including us in their endeavors; and as always, we wouldn’t be here without the support from our wonderful customers–thank you!

 

 

New on the menu: Assunta’s polpette

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Polpette with tomato sauce, da Burrasca

By all family accounts, Paolo’s nonna Assunta was a formidable woman. Built with the bone matrix of a longshoreman or a linebacker, she was as tough as boiled beef and brooked no nonsense from either God, man or beast. She spent most of her life in the lean, hardscrabble existence of a contadina in Vicchio di Mugello until the family moved to their vine-strewn patch of earth in Florence.

She was bawdy in the way of die-hard country-bred Tuscans: every morning along with her caffè d’orzo she’d pop a raw clove of garlic into her mouth and chew forcefully, under the awestruck gaze of young Paolo and his siblings. To their little nose-wrinkles of disgust she’d laugh and say “Meglio puzzare d’aglio che di coglioni” [better to stink of garlic than of balls].

She had a farmer’s obsession with the land and a workaholic’s mania for industry; even in Florence and at an advanced age she was unflagging in her cultivation of the large orto and the tending of her flock of chickens and rabbits (over whose care and caprices she’d cuss lavishly). She was also the main cook in the nine-odd member family—and the bane of her daughter-in-law, Paolo’s mother—until an octogenarian stroke plunked her firmly into a wheelchair. Though still a force to be reckoned with, she was reduced to a state of clamorous resentment at her lot and wept bitter tears over the severing of her connection to mother earth. She was chucked out the door of this life kicking and screaming.

But for all her salt and crust, she was tender and artful at the stove: a culinary virtuoso deftly slinging the down-home classics of the Tuscan repertoire like some kind of hillbilly Puccini. Her pappa al pomodoro was sublime and is perhaps the dish for which Paolo loved her most (and which he recreates in the cart, in season), but a close second was her polpette: crisp, burnished croquettes with an earthy bass line of ground chicken and potato and a bright, delicate counterpoint of lemon zest and herbs.

In honor of dear, indomitable old Assunta—and because they’re just so flippin’ good—we’re now serving these delicious, surprisingly light beauties at the cart. Garlic clove optional.

 

Arista and the best sandwich this side of the Arno

In a town like Portland filled with excellent sandwich slingers, to crown any one as the best is a fool’s game, a folly of personal opinion and pure zeitgeist between two pieces of bread. But we like to think we’ve got a serious contender.

Legend has it that back in 1439*, Cosimo de’ Medici convinced Pope Eugenio IV to shift the Greek and Roman Catholic ecumenical council from plague-ridden Ferrara to Florence and allow the Medici bank to host the guests. While in Florence, the Greek cardinal Basilios Bessarion tasted some Tuscan-style roast pork that really tickled his cassock: he promptly declared it aristos!, using the Greek word for “the best.” Apparently the Florentines thought he was using a name for that particular cut of pork; they found it simpatico and adopted the moniker themselves–and thus the word arista strolled amiably into the Tuscan lexicon. However, I’d wager that there was also a certain appeal in the idea that the Florentine way of cooking pork trumped all others.

For our arista sandwich, we use Carlton Farms pork loin which is encrusted with herbs (including foraged fennel pollen) and roasted. The bread is homemade schiacciata (Florentine-style flat bread–think flatter foccaccia), liberally slathered with an incredibly zesty and tangy salsa verde (a heavenly concoction of parsley, garlic, capers, egg and anchovies), drizzled with sughino–the pork’s pan juices–and cracked black pepper, and topped with fresh watercress. It just might make you bust out the superlatives in Greek, too.

*The charm of legend notwithstanding, evidence of the use of the word arista in Tuscany goes back to even 1287.

Le novità: new on the menu & such

Cari amici, head on over to the menu page to see what Paolo’s been up to at the cart! Inzimino fans: don’t fret, even though we’ve phased it out for the moment, it’ll make a cameo appearance from time to time :-) And be on the lookout for pasta specials and other goodies. (Apropos of this, if you haven’t already, do follow us on Facebook and/or Twitter in order to keep up with the shenanigans).

Ciao – a presto!

 

Backstory: inzimino

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The origin of the word zimino (in + zimino signifying “in ‘zimino’ sauce”), as with that of so many foods, lies somewhere far back in the dusty recesses of history. Under murky layers that evoke the not-so-far-away Arab world, the exotic scent of cumin (cimino in outmoded parlance), or even the unleavened (azzimo) bread of the Jews–the word’s etymology has been the subject of some debate. The most general consensus is that the word is of Arabic origin: samin or zamin, which means fat, fleshy and seems linked to the concept of a fatty or rich condiment or sauce. Moreover, the traditional liberal use of spinach in this dish would also seem to point east, to Persia: wherein lies the august ancestry of this inky-green vegetable.

Though the precise etymology may evade our grasp, we know that the recipe is very old, traces of which go back at least as far as 1300. It was a classic piatto povero, or poor-man’s dish, making up for its lack of silk-purse ingredients by beefing up with vegetables and bread. Originally, the dish was strewn with bits of salted, dried fish such as baccalà (Florence being land-locked, after all)–a cheap ingredient that packed a flavor punch and stretched to help fill many bellies at a time. It is believed that the strong flavor of the fish demanded an equally muscular, spicy sauce in order to achieve the proper balance–clearly something even the most impoverished medieval Florentine was unwilling to forego. And so, with characteristic Italian ingenuity, a rich, zesty sauce was born–for which the Arab word zamin was most likely adopted and italianized over time.

Other versions in other regions have since evolved: in Liguria, Sardinia and even Corsica, some with chick peas instead of calamari (or totani or seppie), or swiss chard instead of spinach, and they are all worthy of our praise. But the classic, über-Florentine recipe remains that of squid simmered at length in a rich stew (or umido) of spinach, tomato and red wine, to be accompanied by garlic-rubbed toasted bread and–hopefully, ideally–shared in good company. It’s a bold, inky dish–as wine-dark as Homer’s Aegean–lusty and redolent of both earth and sea. It’s exactly the kind of thing a famished, humble laborer in the age of Petrarch would tuck into, and feel a richer man for having eaten it.

–by Elizabeth Petrosian

Come and try our version of this Florentine classic–ti aspettiamo!

Link

Photo by Amanda Widis

Photo by Amanda Widis

Read it here: Review in Willamette Week

Thank you, Willamette Week, for the wonderful review. And we agree: the pod we’re in at 28th and Ankeny is awesome and has some really terrific, diverse offerings.

A heartfelt grazie to all our supporters–your appetite and encouragement keeps us going. It’s not easy being one guy alone in a cart; knowing you enjoy his food makes Paolo molto molto felice. And his mamma back in Florence is pretty darn happy about it, too :-)

So we hope to see you soon, new friends and old!